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    • Plusieurs versions

    Logics of critical explanation in social and political theory

    Glynos, Jason
    • Plusieurs versions

    Hating government and voting against one’s interests: Self-Transgression, enjoyment, critique

    Glynos, Jason
    Psychoanalysis, June 2014, Vol.19(2), pp.179-189 [Revue évaluée par les pairs]

    • Plusieurs versions

    On the ideological and political significance of fantasy in the organization of work

    Glynos, Jason
    Psychoanalysis, December 2011, Vol.16(4), pp.373-393 [Revue évaluée par les pairs]

    • Article
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    Neoliberalism, markets, fantasy: The case of health and social care

    Glynos, Jason
    Psychoanalysis, April 2014, Vol.19(1), pp.5-12 [Revue évaluée par les pairs]
    Palgrave Macmillan (IngentaConnect)
    Disponible
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    Titre: Neoliberalism, markets, fantasy: The case of health and social care
    Auteur: Glynos, Jason
    Sujet: Tourism Competitiveness
    Description: In this paper I explore one psychoanalytically inspired reason why we might worry about policies that aim to maximise market competition and user choice in some areas of social life. Using the case of health and social care, I suggest that the spread of neoliberalised practices would amplify splitting tendencies in subjects that subscribe to particular fantasies, for example, independence fantasies of ‘Individual Self-Sufficiency’ or dependence fantasies of the ‘Caring Other’. One of psychoanalysis’s strongest critical contributions resides in its effort to show what such fantasies have in common: the potential to secure allegiance through the promise of a subjective suture that results in fantasmatic over-investment. Such a perspective points to the rather urgent need to identify and promote those wider cultural and structural conditions that militate against fantasmatic over-investment and toward forms of interdependence that acknowledge contingency and ambivalence.
    Fait partie de: Psychoanalysis, April 2014, Vol.19(1), pp.5-12
    Identifiant: 1088-0763 (ISSN)

    • Plusieurs versions

    Neoliberalism, markets, fantasy: The case of health and social care

    Glynos, Jason
    Psychoanalysis, Culture & Society, 4/2014, Vol.19(1), pp.5-12 [Revue évaluée par les pairs]

    • Article
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    ‘Death talk’, ‘loss talk’ and identification in the process of ageing

    West, Karen, Glynos, Jason
    Ageing and Society, 2016, Vol.36(2), pp.225-239 [Revue évaluée par les pairs]
    Cambridge University Press
    Disponible
    Plus…
    Titre: ‘Death talk’, ‘loss talk’ and identification in the process of ageing
    Auteur: West, Karen; Glynos, Jason
    Echelle: 2016
    Collection: 20141020
    Sujet: Forum Article; Third Age/Fourth Age Dialectic; Fantasy; The Real; Mourning; Freud; Lacan
    Description: ABSTRACT In this paper, we examine the injunction issued by the prominent politician, broadcaster and older people's advocate, Baroness Joan Bakewell, to engage in ‘death talk’. We see positive ethical potential in this injunction, insofar as it serves as a call to confront more directly the prospects of death and dying, thereby releasing creative energies with which to change our outlook on life and ageing more generally. However, when set against a culture that valorises choice, independence and control, the positive ethical potential of such injunctions is invariably thwarted. We illustrate this with reference to one of Bakewell's interventions in a debate on scientific innovation and population ageing. In examining the context of her intervention, we affirm her intuition about its positive ethical potential, but we also point to an ambivalence that accompanies the formulation of the injunction – one that ultimately blunts the force and significance of her intuition. We suggest that Gilleard and Higgs' idea of the third age/fourth age dialectic, combined with the psycho-analytic concepts of fantasy and mourning, allow us to express this intuition better. In particular, we argue that the expression ‘loss talk’ (rather than ‘death talk’) better captures the ethical negotiations that should ultimately underpin the transformation processes associated with ageing, and that our theoretical contextualisation of her remarks can help us see this more clearly. In this view, deteriorations in our physical and mental capacities are best understood as involving changes in how we see ourselves, i.e. in our identifications, and so what is at stake are losses of identity and the conditions under which we can engage in new processes of identification.
    Précédemment: 20162014021020
    Fait partie de: Ageing and Society, 2016, Vol.36(2), pp.225-239
    Classement: 201602
    Identifiant: 0144-686X (ISSN); 1469-1779 (E-ISSN); 10.1017/S0144686X14001184 (DOI)

    • Plusieurs versions

    Psychical contexts of subjectivity and performative practices of remuneration: teaching assistants' narratives of work

    Lapping, Claudia, Glynos, Jason
    Journal of Education Policy, 02 January 2018, Vol.33(1), pp.23-42 [Revue évaluée par les pairs]

    • Plusieurs versions

    Ideology as blocked mourning: Greek national identity in times of economic crisis and austerity

    Glynos, Jason, Voutyras, Savvas
    Journal of Political Ideologies, 01 September 2016, Vol.21(3), pp.201-224 [Revue évaluée par les pairs]

    • Plusieurs versions

    Varieties of co-production in public services: time banks in a UK health policy context

    Glynos, Jason, Speed, Ewen
    Critical Policy Studies, 01 December 2012, Vol.6(4), pp.402-433 [Revue évaluée par les pairs]
    Taylor & Francis (Taylor & Francis Group)
    • Plusieurs versions

    Politics and the unconscious – An interview with Ernesto Laclau

    Glynos, Jason, Stavrakakis, Yannis
    Subjectivity, 9/2010, Vol.3(3), pp.231-244 [Revue évaluée par les pairs]