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    Mammalogy

    Vaughan, Terry A
    Czaplewski, Nicholas J, Ryan, James M. (James Michael), 1957-
    Sudbury, Mass. : Jones and Bartlett Publishers
    2011
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    Titre: Mammalogy / Terry A. Vaughan, James M. Ryan, Nicholas J. Czaplewski
    Auteur: Vaughan, Terry A
    Contributeur: Czaplewski, Nicholas J; Ryan, James M. (James Michael), 1957-
    Edition: 5th ed..
    Editeur: Sudbury, Mass. : Jones and Bartlett Publishers
    Date: 2011
    Collation: xvii, 750 p. : ill.
    Sujet LCSH: Mammals
    Note: Part I Introduction to the Mammalia Chapter 1 Introduction Chapter 2 Mammalian Characteristics Chapter 3 Mammalian Origins Chapter 4 Classification of Mammals Part II Mammalian Diversity Chapter 5 Monotremata Chapter 6 Metatheria Chapter 7 Introduction to Eutherian Mammals Chapter 8 Afrosoricidea, Macroscelidea, and Tublidentata Chapter 9 Paenungulata Chapter 10 Cingulata, Pilosa, and Pholidota Chapter 11 Dermoptera and Scandentia Chapter 12 Primates Chapter 13 Rodentia and Lagomorpha Chapter 14 Erinaceomorpha and Soricomorpha Chapter 15 Chiroptera Chapter 16 Carnivora Chapter 17 Perissodactyla Chapter 18 Artiodactyla Chapter 19 Cetacea Part III Mammalian Structure and Function Chapter 20 Reproduction Chapter 21 Aspects of Physiology Chapter 22 Echolocation Part IV Ecology, Behavior, and Conservation Chapter 23 Ecology Chapter 24 Behavior Chapter 25 Zoogeography Chapter 26 Mammalian Conservation Chapter 27 Mammal Domestication (Online) Chapter 28 Mammalian Disease and Zoonoses - Includes bibliographical references and index.
    Classification: LC QL703
    Identifiant: 0763762997 (ISBN); 9780763762995 (ISBN)
    No RERO: R007166818
    Permalien:
    http://data.rero.ch/01-R007166818/html?view=FR_V1

    • Article
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    Opportunistic Feeding by Two Species of Myotis

    Vaughan, Terry A.
    Journal of Mammalogy, 1 February 1980, Vol.61(1), pp.118-119 [Revue évaluée par les pairs]
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    Titre: Opportunistic Feeding by Two Species of Myotis
    Auteur: Vaughan, Terry A.
    Sujet: Zoology;
    Fait partie de: Journal of Mammalogy, 1 February 1980, Vol.61(1), pp.118-119
    Identifiant: 00222372 (ISSN); 15451542 (E-ISSN); 10.2307/1379964 (DOI)

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    Behavioral Thermoregulation in the African Yellow-Winged Bat

    Vaughan, Terry A.
    Journal of Mammalogy, 1 May 1987, Vol.68(2), pp.376-378 [Revue évaluée par les pairs]
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    Titre: Behavioral Thermoregulation in the African Yellow-Winged Bat
    Auteur: Vaughan, Terry A.
    Sujet: Thermoregulatory Behavior ; Roosting Behavior ; Mammals (Excluding Primates) ; Lavia Frons ; Lavia Frons;
    Description: The author observed five pairs of African yellow-winged bats (Lavia frons ) in Kenya, East Africa, for 203 weeks each month. These monogamous bats are insectivorous and territorial. Pairs usually roosted by day in the crowns of Acacia tortilis , moved to different roost several times each day, and changed their roosting-site preferences seasonally. This report considers these movements in relation to seasonal changes in temperature, rainfall, and the phenology of A. tortilis .
    Fait partie de: Journal of Mammalogy, 1 May 1987, Vol.68(2), pp.376-378
    Identifiant: 00222372 (ISSN); 15451542 (E-ISSN); 10.2307/1381476 (DOI)

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    Stephens' Woodrat, a Dietary Specialist

    Vaughan, Terry A.
    Journal of Mammalogy, 1 February 1982, Vol.63(1), pp.53-62 [Revue évaluée par les pairs]
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    Titre: Stephens' Woodrat, a Dietary Specialist
    Auteur: Vaughan, Terry A.
    Sujet: Zoology;
    Description: The feeding biology of Stephens' woodrat (Neotoma stephensi) was studied in juniper woodlands in Arizona. Microscopic examinations were made of fecal samples from live-trapped animals, observations were made on foraging behavior, and data on plant communities occupied by this woodrat were gathered. Stephens' woodrat is a dietary specialist, unique in its ability to utilize juniper throughout the year. Some 90% of the diet is juniper: foliage is most important, but male and female cones are also eaten. This woodrat is a highly selective central-place forager, feeding repeatedly on certain individual junipers and avoiding others. Such finely tuned foraging probably facilitates the exploitation of junipers with unusually low levels of defensive, digestibility-reducing chemicals, and may be the key to this animal's success as a juniper specialist. Stephens' woodrat may be considered a relict species, largely restricted to areas supporting vestiges of a xeric juniper woodland that in the early Holocene was widespread in the southwestern United States.
    Fait partie de: Journal of Mammalogy, 1 February 1982, Vol.63(1), pp.53-62
    Identifiant: 00222372 (ISSN); 15451542 (E-ISSN); 10.2307/1380671 (DOI)

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    Seasonality and the Behavior of the African Yellow-Winged Bat

    Vaughan, Terry A., Vaughan, Rosemary P.
    Journal of Mammalogy, 1 February 1986, Vol.67(1), pp.91-102 [Revue évaluée par les pairs]
    Archival Journals (JSTOR)
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    Titre: Seasonality and the Behavior of the African Yellow-Winged Bat
    Auteur: Vaughan, Terry A.; Vaughan, Rosemary P.
    Sujet: Zoology;
    Description: The African yellow-winged bat (Lavia frons) was observed in Kenya, East Africa, through one wet and one dry season (December 1982 to July 1983). This opportunistic, sit-and-wait predator typically forages from the crowns of Acacia tortilis and captures insects through a broad range of elevations by brief, precise interceptions. Lavia is monogamous. Members of a pair roost together in a territory defended by the male, forage either separately or together, and share the territory for some 3 months with the single young. Acacia tortilis responds to erratic dry-season rains by flowering and growing new leaves; attending brief bursts of insect abundance may be of crucial importance to Lavia during dry-season energy bottlenecks. Many of the most distinctive aspects of the life history of Lavia-monogamy, territoriality, the division of labor, opportunistic foraging, a long mother-young association, and a close association between Lavia and A. tortilis-probably are adaptations to recurring periods of energy stress.
    Fait partie de: Journal of Mammalogy, 1 February 1986, Vol.67(1), pp.91-102
    Identifiant: 00222372 (ISSN); 15451542 (E-ISSN); 10.2307/1381005 (DOI)

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    Parental Behavior in the African Yellow-Winged Bat (Lavia frons)

    Vaughan, Terry A., Vaughan, Rosemary P.
    Journal of Mammalogy, 1 May 1987, Vol.68(2), pp.217-223 [Revue évaluée par les pairs]
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    Titre: Parental Behavior in the African Yellow-Winged Bat (Lavia frons)
    Auteur: Vaughan, Terry A.; Vaughan, Rosemary P.
    Sujet: Zoology;
    Description: The parental behavior of five monogamous pairs of African yellow-winged bats (Lavia frons) was observed in Kenya. Each female bore a single young, which clung to its mother continuously until about one week before it first flew and foraged. Newly volant young foraged with their parents and soon developed foraging performance that closely resembled that of their parents. Young were weaned about 20 days after becoming volant. Until at least 50 days after its first flight, each young shared its parents' territory, synchronized its grooming and foraging periods with those of its parents, and periodically huddled against its mother when roosting. Recurring but unpredictable periods of low insect density have seemingly selected for an extended period of parent-young association, during which the young become skilled opportunistic foragers.
    Fait partie de: Journal of Mammalogy, 1 May 1987, Vol.68(2), pp.217-223
    Identifiant: 00222372 (ISSN); 15451542 (E-ISSN); 10.2307/1381460 (DOI)

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    The Importance of Arthropods in the Diet of Zapus princeps in a Subalpine Habitat

    Vaughan, Terry A., Weil, Wendy Pearse
    Journal of Mammalogy, 1 February 1980, Vol.61(1), pp.122-124 [Revue évaluée par les pairs]
    Archival Journals (JSTOR)
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    Reproduction in Stephens' Woodrat: The Wages of Folivory

    Vaughan, Terry A., Czaplewski, Nicholas J.
    Journal of Mammalogy, 1 August 1985, Vol.66(3), pp.429-443 [Revue évaluée par les pairs]
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    Titre: Reproduction in Stephens' Woodrat: The Wages of Folivory
    Auteur: Vaughan, Terry A.; Czaplewski, Nicholas J.
    Sujet: Zoology;
    Description: The reproductive pattern of Stephens' woodrat (Neotoma stephensi) reflects strong selection for energy conservation. We hypothesize that the major selective force is this woodrat's dietary specialization on juniper foliage, a food rich in defensive, digestibility-reducing chemicals. Compared to most other rodents, and to other species of woodrats, Stephens' woodrat has small litters (usually a single young); each litter comprises a small percentage of the mother's weight (8%), young grow slowly and are weaned late, and there is broad temporal overlap of suckling and feeding on solid food. In addition, females attain reproductive maturity late (typically at some 10 months of age), commonly suffer severe weight losses during lactation, and many individuals recover this weight slowly after lactation. Most natality occurs in the period from March through May; of the females that live to reproduce, only 15% survive to reproduce a second season. Dietary selectivity-the use of foliage from specific trees with relatively low levels of defensive chemicals-is probably learned in the long pre-weaning period and may allow females to maximize milk production, growth rates and survival of her young, and, by minimizing lactation weight losses and the time necessary to regain weight, may shorten the interval between litters. Wide variation in reproductive performance among females may be associated with differences among den sites with respect to access to junipers with low levels of defensive compounds.
    Fait partie de: Journal of Mammalogy, 1 August 1985, Vol.66(3), pp.429-443
    Identifiant: 00222372 (ISSN); 15451542 (E-ISSN); 10.2307/1380917 (DOI)

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    Behavioral Ecology of an Insular Woodrat

    Vaughan, Terry A., Schwartz, Steven T.
    Journal of Mammalogy, 1 May 1980, Vol.61(2), pp.205-218 [Revue évaluée par les pairs]
    Archival Journals (JSTOR)
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    Titre: Behavioral Ecology of an Insular Woodrat
    Auteur: Vaughan, Terry A.; Schwartz, Steven T.
    Sujet: Zoology;
    Description: An endemic, insular subspecies of the desert woodrat (Neotoma lepida latirostra) was studied on Isla Danzante in the Gulf of California. Woodrats were livetrapped, marked and released, the compositions of plants in fecal samples were analyzed, and nocturnal behavior was observed by using light tracking and a night-viewing device. The evolution of the Danzante woodrat has seemingly been influenced by the unique insular environment, characterized by a depauperate biota, few predators, a long dry season, low precipitation, and a warm climate. This woodrat, the primary herbivore on the island, is roughly twice the size of mainland representatives of the species, and sexual size dimorphism is pronounced. Adults averaged 250 g (males, 281 g; females, 221 g). Ironwood (Olneya tesota) is the staple food, comprising 72% of the diet. Woodrats occur at low densities (3.5 to 4.8/ha) and occupy large territories: summer territories of adult males average 0.35 ha, and those of females, 0.08 ha. The woodrats have abandoned central-place foraging and remain away from daytime retreats an average of some 53 min/h during the pre-midnight hours. The mating system is resource defense polygyny. Ironwood is the limiting resource, and the largest adult males maintain extensive, ironwood-rich territories that enclose or partly enclose the territories of up to three females. Some individuals of both sexes have long reproductive lives (of at least 2.5 years), during which each animal is faithful to its own area.
    Fait partie de: Journal of Mammalogy, 1 May 1980, Vol.61(2), pp.205-218
    Identifiant: 00222372 (ISSN); 15451542 (E-ISSN); 10.2307/1380041 (DOI)

    • Plusieurs versions

    TWO PARAPATRIC SPECIES OF POCKET GOPHERS

    Vaughan, Terry A.
    Evolution, March 1967, Vol.21(1), pp.148-158 [Revue évaluée par les pairs]