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    • Livre
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    Mammal species of the world : a taxonomic and geographic reference

    Wilson, Don E, Reeder, DeeAnn M
    Baltimore : The Johns Hopkins University Press
    2005
    Disponible
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    Chargement
    Erreur de chargement
    Titre: Mammal species of the world : a taxonomic and geographic reference / ed. by Don E. Wilson and DeeAnn M. Reeder
    Auteur: Wilson, Don E; Reeder, DeeAnn M
    Edition: 3rd ed..
    Editeur: Baltimore : The Johns Hopkins University Press
    Date: 2005
    Collation: 459 p. : ill.
    Sujet RERO: mammifère - distribution géographique - Animaux - Classification - Mammifères
    Sujet RERO - forme: [liste de genres et d'espèces]
    Identifiant: http://catalogue.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/cb40022214m (URN)
    No RERO: R004762612
    Permalien:
    http://data.rero.ch/01-R004762612/html?view=GE_V1

    • Plusieurs versions

    Crowding increases salivary cortisol but not self‐directed behavior in captive baboons

    Pearson, Brandon L., Reeder, Deeann M., Judge, Peter G.
    American Journal of Primatology, April 2015, Vol.77(4), pp.462-467 [Revue évaluée par les pairs]

    • Plusieurs versions

    Effect of torpor on host transcriptomic responses to a fungal pathogen in hibernating bats

    Field, Kenneth A., Sewall, Brent J., Prokkola, Jenni M., Turner, Gregory G., Gagnon, Marianne F., Lilley, Thomas M., Paul White, J., Johnson, Joseph S., Hauer, Christopher L., Reeder, Deeann M.
    Molecular Ecology, September 2018, Vol.27(18), pp.3727-3743 [Revue évaluée par les pairs]

    • Plusieurs versions

    White-Nose Syndrome Fungus in a 1918 Bat Specimen from France

    Campana, Michael G, Kurata, Naoko P, Foster, Jeffrey T, Helgen, Lauren E, Reeder, Deeann M, Fleischer, Robert C, Helgen, Kristofer M
    Emerging infectious diseases, September 2017, Vol.23(9), pp.1611-1612 [Revue évaluée par les pairs]

    • Research Dataset
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    Data from: Immune responses in hibernating little brown myotis (Myotis lucifugus) with white-nose syndrome

    Lilley, Thomas M., Prokkola, Jenni M., Johnson, Joseph S., Rogers, Elizabeth J., Gronsky, Sarah, Kurta, Allen, Reeder, DeeAnn M., Field, Kenneth A.
    DataCite
    Disponible
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    Titre: Data from: Immune responses in hibernating little brown myotis (Myotis lucifugus) with white-nose syndrome
    Auteur: Lilley, Thomas M.; Prokkola, Jenni M.; Johnson, Joseph S.; Rogers, Elizabeth J.; Gronsky, Sarah; Kurta, Allen; Reeder, DeeAnn M.; Field, Kenneth A.
    Editeur: Dryad Digital Repository
    Date: 2017
    Sujet: White Nose Syndrome ; Hibernation ; Immune Response ; Wildlife Disease ; Fungal Infection ; Myotis Lucifugus
    Identifiant: 10.5061/DRYAD.8M0K4 (DOI); 0962-8452 (ISSN); 10.5061/DRYAD.8M0K4/1 (RELATED DOI); 10.1098/RSPB.2016.2232 (RELATED DOI); 10.1098/RSPB.2016.2232 (RELATED DOI)

    • Plusieurs versions

    Balancing the Costs of Wildlife Research with the Benefits of Understanding a Panzootic Disease, White-Nose Syndrome

    Reeder, Deeann M, Field, Kenneth A, Slater, Matthew H
    ILAR Journal, 2016, Vol. 56(3), pp.275-282 [Revue évaluée par les pairs]

    • Article
    Sélectionner

    White-nose syndrome-affected little brown myotis (Myotis lucifugus) increase grooming and other active behaviors during arousals from hibernation

    Brownlee-Bouboulis, Sarah A, Reeder, Deeann M
    Journal of wildlife diseases, October 2013, Vol.49(4), pp.850-9 [Revue évaluée par les pairs]
    MEDLINE/PubMed (U.S. National Library of Medicine)
    Disponible
    Plus…
    Titre: White-nose syndrome-affected little brown myotis (Myotis lucifugus) increase grooming and other active behaviors during arousals from hibernation
    Auteur: Brownlee-Bouboulis, Sarah A; Reeder, Deeann M
    Sujet: Behavior, Animal ; Chiroptera ; Mycoses -- Veterinary
    Description: White-nose syndrome (WNS) is an emerging infectious disease of hibernating bats linked to the death of an estimated 5.7 million or more bats in the northeastern United States and Canada. White-nose syndrome is caused by the cold-loving fungus Pseudogymnoascus destructans (Pd), which invades the skin of the muzzles, ears, and wings of hibernating bats. Previous work has shown that WNS-affected bats arouse to euthermic or near euthermic temperatures during hibernation significantly more frequently than normal and that these too-frequent arousals are tied to severity of infection and death date. We quantified the behavior of bats during these arousal bouts to understand better the causes and consequences of these arousals. We hypothesized that WNS-affected bats would display increased levels of activity (especially grooming) during their arousal bouts from hibernation compared to WNS-unaffected bats. Behavior of both affected and unaffected hibernating bats in captivity was monitored from...
    Fait partie de: Journal of wildlife diseases, October 2013, Vol.49(4), pp.850-9
    Identifiant: 1943-3700 (E-ISSN); 24502712 Version (PMID); 10.7589/2012-10-242 (DOI)

    • Plusieurs versions

    Host, Pathogen, and Environmental Characteristics Predict White-Nose Syndrome Mortality in Captive Little Brown Myotis ( Myotis lucifugus )

    Johnson, Joseph S, Reeder, Deeann M, Mcmichael, James W, Meierhofer, Melissa B, Stern, Daniel W. F, Lumadue, Shayne S, Sigler, Lauren E, Winters, Harrison D, Vodzak, Megan E, Kurta, Allen, Kath, Joseph A, Field, Kenneth A
    PLoS ONE, 2014, Vol.9(11) [Revue évaluée par les pairs]

    • Article
    Sélectionner

    A new world compendium

    Reeder, Deeann M.
    American Journal of Primatology, 1997, Vol.43(4), pp.361-363 [Revue évaluée par les pairs]
    John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
    Disponible
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    Titre: A new world compendium
    Auteur: Reeder, Deeann M.
    Description: Review of , edited by Warren G. Kinzey. New York, Walter de Gruyter, Inc., 1997, xvii + 436 pp, cloth $6.95, paper $31.95.
    Fait partie de: American Journal of Primatology, 1997, Vol.43(4), pp.361-363
    Identifiant: 0275-2565 (ISSN); 1098-2345 (E-ISSN); 10.1002/(SICI)1098-2345(1997)43 (DOI)

    • Article
    Sélectionner

    Eggshell colour is more strongly affected by maternal identity than by dietary antioxidants in a captive poultry system

    Dearborn, Donald C., Hanley, Daniel, Ballantine, Katherine, Cullum, John, Reeder, Deeann M.
    Functional Ecology, August 2012, Vol.26(4), pp.912-920 [Revue évaluée par les pairs]
    John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
    Disponible
    Plus…
    Titre: Eggshell colour is more strongly affected by maternal identity than by dietary antioxidants in a captive poultry system
    Auteur: Dearborn, Donald C.; Hanley, Daniel; Ballantine, Katherine; Cullum, John; Reeder, Deeann M.
    Sujet: Antioxidants ; Biliverdin ; Diet ; Eggshell Colour ; Sexual Signalling Hypothesis
    Description: Biologists have long puzzled over the apparent conspicuousness of blue‐green eggshell coloration in birds. One candidate explanation is the ‘sexual signalling hypothesis’ that the blue‐green colour of eggshells can reveal an intrinsic aspect of females' physiological quality, with only high‐quality females having sufficient antioxidant capacity to pigment their eggs with large amounts of biliverdin. Subsequent work has argued instead that eggshell colour might signal condition‐dependent traits based on diet. Using Araucana chickens that lay blue‐green eggs, we explored (i) whether high levels of dietary antioxidants yield eggshells with greater blue‐green reflectance, (ii) whether females differ from one another in eggshell coloration despite standardized environments, diets and rearing conditions, and (iii) the relative strength with which diet vs. female identity affects eggshell coloration. We reared birds to maturity and then placed them on either a high‐ or low‐antioxidant diet, differing fourfold in itamin acetate and itamin retinol. After 8 weeks, the treatments were reversed, such that females laid eggs on both diets in an order‐balanced design. We measured the reflectance spectra of 545 eggs from 25 females. Diet had a very limited effect on eggshell spectral reflectance, but individual females differed strongly and consistently from one another, despite having been reared under uniform conditions. However, predictions from avian visual modelling suggest that most of the egg colour differences between females, and nearly all of the differences between diets, are unlikely to be visually discriminable. Our data suggest that eggshell reflectance spectra may carry information on intrinsic properties of the female that laid the eggs, but the utility of this coloration as a signal to conspecifics in this species may be limited by the sensitivity of a receiver to detect it.
    Fait partie de: Functional Ecology, August 2012, Vol.26(4), pp.912-920
    Identifiant: 0269-8463 (ISSN); 1365-2435 (E-ISSN); 10.1111/j.1365-2435.2012.02001.x (DOI)