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  • Film
    Sélectionner

    Dunkerque

    Nolan, Christopher, 1970-, Zimmer, Hans, musicien, Thomas, Emma
    [Neuilly-sur-Seine] : Warner Bros. Entertainment France
    2017
    Recherche de la disponibilité
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    Chargement
    Erreur de chargement
    Titre: Dunkerque [Enregistrement vidéo] / un film de Christopher Nolan ; écrit par Christopher Nolan ; musique de Hans Zimmer ; prod. par Emma Thomas
    Auteur: Nolan, Christopher, 1970-; Zimmer, Hans, musicien; Thomas, Emma
    Editeur: [Neuilly-sur-Seine] : Warner Bros. Entertainment France
    Date: 2017
    Collation: 1 DVD-vidéo
    Sujet RERO - Fiction: Bataille de Dunkerque (1940) - Guerre mondiale (1939-1945) - [Films de guerre] - [Films historiques] - [Fictions] - [DVD]
    Description: "Des centaines de milliers de soldats anglais et alliés sont encerclés par les forces ennemies. Ils sont bientôt pris en étau entre la mer et les Allemands... L'histoire se déroule sur terre, en mer et dans les airs. Des avions Spitfire de la Royal Air Force prennent en chasse l'ennemi, tendant de protéger les hommes sans défense, coincés sur la plage. Entretemps, des centaines de petites embarcations pilotées par des civils et des militaires cherchent à rejoindre Dunkerque pour sauver les soldats. Une opération à haut risque et une véritable course contre la montre..."
    "It is World War II, and Allied forces are under attack by Germany. The setting is Dunkirk, France, and their only hope for survival is evacuation. Along the way, the beauty and resilience of the human spirit is tested. Allied forces have been outmaneuvered and outnumbered, but somehow find it within themselves to start plotting their great escape. With so many factors in play, it seems as though they will never make it. But with a lot of strategy and a little luck, just one chance emerges."
    Historique
    Guerre
    Public cible: Dès 12 ans
    Interprètes: Tom Glynn-Carney ; Jack Lowden ; Harry Styles ; Aneurin Barnard ; James d'Arcy ; Barry Keoghan ; Kenneth Branagh ; Cillian Murphy ; Mark Rylance ; Tom Hardy ... et al.
    Note: Une prod. Syncopy, 2017 - Durée du film: ca. 102 min. - Choix de langues: Français, anglais, italien, allemand. Sous-titres: Français, néerlandais
    Classification: ge-heid-nc HEIDVD 3530
    ge-heid 6.4 DUN
    meum beaux-arts, cinéma
    dew-meum 791.43 NOLA/5
    No RERO: R008744561
    Permalien:
    http://data.rero.ch/01-R008744561/html?view=GE_V1

  • Plusieurs versions

    When Will Collective Action Be Effective? Violent and Non-Violent Protests Differentially Influence Perceptions of Legitimacy and Efficacy Among Sympathizers

    Thomas, Emma F, Louis, Winnifred R
    Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 2014, Vol.40(2), pp.263-276 [Revue évaluée par les pairs]

  • Plusieurs versions

    Improved stove interventions to reduce household air pollution in low and middle income countries: a descriptive systematic review

    Thomas, Emma, Wickramasinghe, Kremlin, Mendis, Shanthi, Roberts, Nia, Foster, Charlie
    BMC public health, 14 July 2015, Vol.15, pp.650 [Revue évaluée par les pairs]

  • Article
    Sélectionner

    Social interaction and psychological pathways to political engagement and extremism

    Thomas, Emma F., Mcgarty, Craig, Louis, Winnifred
    European Journal of Social Psychology, February 2014, Vol.44(1), pp.15-22 [Revue évaluée par les pairs]
    John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
    Disponible
    Plus…
    Titre: Social interaction and psychological pathways to political engagement and extremism
    Auteur: Thomas, Emma F.; Mcgarty, Craig; Louis, Winnifred
    Sujet: Extremism - Social Interaction - Social Psychology - Forecasts - Sociology;
    Description: Although psychology has recently witnessed a burgeoning interest in the predictors of social and political action generally, little research has considered the psychological mechanisms by which people come to choose extreme or radical forms of action. How and why do groups come to favor radical or extreme solutions (radicalization) over conventional political pathways (politicization)? Theory in both political science and psychology suggests that social interaction plays an important role, but this has never been demonstrated experimentally. Results (N = 114) show that social interaction can lead to both politicized and radicalized solutions but that radicalization rests on the perception that extreme action is legitimate. The findings provide the first experimental analog of the group‐based dynamics that underpin political engagement and political extremism. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    Fait partie de: European Journal of Social Psychology, February 2014, Vol.44(1), pp.15-22
    Identifiant: 0046-2772 (ISSN); 1099-0992 (E-ISSN); 10.1002/ejsp.1988 (DOI)

  • Article
    Sélectionner

    From “I” to “We”: Different forms of identity, emotion, and belief predict victim support volunteerism among nominal and active supporters

    Thomas, Emma F., Rathmann, Lisa, Mcgarty, Craig
    Journal of Applied Social Psychology, April 2017, Vol.47(4), pp.213-223 [Revue évaluée par les pairs]
    John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
    Disponible
    Plus…
    Titre: From “I” to “We”: Different forms of identity, emotion, and belief predict victim support volunteerism among nominal and active supporters
    Auteur: Thomas, Emma F.; Rathmann, Lisa; Mcgarty, Craig
    Sujet: Volunteerism – Social Aspects;
    Description: Understanding how to attract and maintain volunteers is crucial for the operation of victim support organizations. We propose that volunteerism can be understood in a similar way as collective action. Active ( = 99) and nominal supporters ( = 134) completed measures of identities (personal, social, and organizational), emotions (sympathy, outrage, and pride), and efficacy beliefs (self‐, group, and organizational). The results revealed a different pattern of predictors of volunteerism for the two samples. Among nominal supporters, commitment to volunteerism was predicted by personal identity (“I”), sympathy, and self‐efficacy; among the actively engaged, volunteerism was predicted by social identity (“we”), outrage, and self‐efficacy. These results suggest that engagement with volunteerism is associated with qualitatively different processes for those nominally versus actively supportive of volunteer efforts.
    Fait partie de: Journal of Applied Social Psychology, April 2017, Vol.47(4), pp.213-223
    Identifiant: 0021-9029 (ISSN); 1559-1816 (E-ISSN); 10.1111/jasp.12428 (DOI)

  • Plusieurs versions

    Predictive validity of the AUDIT for hazardous alcohol consumption in recently released prisoners

    Thomas, Emma, Degenhardt, Louisa, Alati, Rosa, Kinner, Stuart
    Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 1 January 2014, Vol.134, pp.322-329 [Revue évaluée par les pairs]

  • Plusieurs versions

    Collective Self-Determination: How the Agent of Help Promotes Pride, Well-Being, and Support for Intergroup Helping

    Thomas, Emma F, Amiot, Catherine E, Louis, Winnifred R, Goddard, Alice
    Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 2017, Vol.43(5), pp.662-677 [Revue évaluée par les pairs]

  • Plusieurs versions

    After Aylan Kurdi: How Tweeting About Death, Threat, and Harm Predict Increased Expressions of Solidarity With Refugees Over Time

    Smith, Laura G. E, Mcgarty, Craig, Thomas, Emma F
    Psychological Science, 2018, Vol.29(4), pp.623-634 [Revue évaluée par les pairs]

  • Article
    Sélectionner

    The “Activist Identity” and Activism across Domains: A Multiple Identities Analysis

    Louis, Winnifred R., Amiot, Catherine E., Thomas, Emma F., Blackwood, Leda
    Journal of Social Issues, June 2016, Vol.72(2), pp.242-263 [Revue évaluée par les pairs]
    John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
    Disponible
    Plus…
    Titre: The “Activist Identity” and Activism across Domains: A Multiple Identities Analysis
    Auteur: Louis, Winnifred R.; Amiot, Catherine E.; Thomas, Emma F.; Blackwood, Leda
    Sujet: Activism - Activists - Group Dynamics - Social Networks;
    Description: Two correlational studies of activists examined the association between belonging to community organizations or groups and sustained activism within a particular domain. In Study 1 ( = 45) larger activist networks, controlling for activist identification and greater political knowledge, were associated with stronger activism intentions. In Study 2 ( = 155), larger Time 1 peace activism social networks were associated with more Time 2 peace activism and, via Time 2 activism, with sustained activism at Time 3. In contrast, Time 1 nationalist and party political identities were inhibiting factors of peace activism at Time 2, and indirectly at Time 3. In addition, larger peace activism networks at Time 1 were associated with greater international human rights activism and Christian activism at Time 3, but not as consistently with other forms of cross‐domain activism. The possible organizing principles for these interrelationships are discussed.
    Fait partie de: Journal of Social Issues, June 2016, Vol.72(2), pp.242-263
    Identifiant: 0022-4537 (ISSN); 1540-4560 (E-ISSN); 10.1111/josi.12165 (DOI)

  • Article
    Sélectionner

    I feel you feel what I feel: Perceived perspective‐taking promotes victims' conciliatory attitudes because of inferred emotions in the offender

    Berndsen, Mariëtte, Wenzel, Michael, Thomas, Emma F., Noske, Breeanna
    European Journal of Social Psychology, March 2018, Vol.48(2), pp.O103-O120 [Revue évaluée par les pairs]
    John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
    Disponible
    Plus…
    Titre: I feel you feel what I feel: Perceived perspective‐taking promotes victims' conciliatory attitudes because of inferred emotions in the offender
    Auteur: Berndsen, Mariëtte; Wenzel, Michael; Thomas, Emma F.; Noske, Breeanna
    Sujet: Perceived Perspective‐Taking - Bullying - Inferred Moral Emotions - Trust - Forgiveness - Severity Of Harm
    Description: In the context of bullying in a nursing workplace, we test the argument that an offender's perspective‐taking promotes victim conciliation, mediated by perceived perspective‐taking, that is, the extent to which the victim perceives the offender as taking their perspective. Perceived perspective‐taking facilitates the attribution of moral emotions (remorse, etc.) to the offender, thereby promoting conciliatory victim responses. However, perceived perspective‐taking would be qualified by the extent to which the severity of consequences expressed in the offender's perspective‐taking matches or surpasses the severity for the victim. In Studies 1 and 2 (s = 141 and 122, respectively), victims indicated greater trust and/or forgiveness when the offender had taken the victim's perspective. This was sequentially mediated by perceived perspective‐taking and victim's inference that the offender had felt moral emotions. As predicted, in Study 2 (but not Study 1), severity of consequences qualified victims' perceived perspective‐taking. Study 3 ( = 138) examined three potential mechanisms for the moderation by severity. Victims attributed greater perspective‐taking to the offender when the consequences were less severe than voiced by the offender, suggesting victims' appreciation of the offender's generous appraisal. Attributions of perspective‐taking and of moral emotions to the offender may play an important role in reconciliation processes. Key outcome: To the extent that victims perceive the offender as taking their perspective (perceived perspective‐taking), they infer that the offender feels more moral emotions, prompting victims to be more conciliatory. Perceived perspective‐taking benefits from the offender over‐stating the consequences to the victim.
    Fait partie de: European Journal of Social Psychology, March 2018, Vol.48(2), pp.O103-O120
    Identifiant: 0046-2772 (ISSN); 1099-0992 (E-ISSN); 10.1002/ejsp.2321 (DOI)