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    SPREAD OF FOLKLORE MOTIFS AS A PROXY FOR INFORMATION EXCHANGE: CONTACT ZONES AND BORDERLINES IN EURASIA

    Berezkin, Yuri
    Trames : A Journal of the Humanities and Social Sciences, 2015, Vol.19(1), pp.3-13 [Revue évaluée par les pairs]
    © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved, ProQuest Sociology, East Europe, Central Europe Database, Publicly Available Content Database, Research Library China, ProQuest Research Library, ProQuest Central, Research Library (Alumni edition), ProQuest Social Sciences Premium Collection, ProQuest Sociology Collection, ProQuest Central (new), ProQuest Central K-12, ProQuest Central Korea, Research Library Prep, Social Science Premium Collection, Sociology Collection, ProQuest Central Essentials, ProQuest Central China, ProQuest One Academic, ProQuest One Literature
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    Titre: SPREAD OF FOLKLORE MOTIFS AS A PROXY FOR INFORMATION EXCHANGE: CONTACT ZONES AND BORDERLINES IN EURASIA
    Auteur: Berezkin, Yuri
    Sujet: Indiana ; Africa ; Siberia ; Eurasia ; Lithuanian ; Folklore ; Ethnography ; Latvian ; Finno Ugric Languages ; Turkic Languages ; Traditions ; Folklore ; Mythology ; Finnish Language ; Museums ; Ukrainian ; Cosmology ; Databases ; Belarusian Language ; Estonian Language
    Description: The aim of this paper is to reveal patterns of areal spread of folklore motifs in Eurasia and to understand their rationale. The distribution of 615 motifs related to adventures and tricks according to 339 Old World traditions was statistically processed using factor analysis. Tendencies in the areal spread of motifs are interpreted as proxies for the intensity of information exchange between people. Two regularities in distribution of motifs deserve attention. Western Europe and the Mediterranean with adjacent Africa are contrasted with the Caucasus, Central Asia and Mongolia with adjacent Siberia. Finnish, Estonian, Latvian, Lithuanian, Byelorussian and Ukrainian traditions are strongly "European", the folklore of the Crimea Tatars and especially of the Bashkir is strongly "Asiatic", the folklore of the Gagauz, Volga Tatars, Mari, Udmurts and Komi moderately "Asiatic", the Russians, the Setu, the Karelians and the Mordvinians are slightly on the "European" side while the Chuvash are slightly...
    Fait partie de: Trames : A Journal of the Humanities and Social Sciences, 2015, Vol.19(1), pp.3-13
    Identifiant: 14060922 (ISSN); 17367514 (E-ISSN)

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    STRATIGRAPHY OF CULTURAL INTERACTION IN EURASIA BASED ON COMPUTING OF FOLKLORE MOTIFS

    Berezkin, Yuri
    Trames : A Journal of the Humanities and Social Sciences, 2016, Vol.20(3), pp.217-227 [Revue évaluée par les pairs]
    © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved, ProQuest Sociology, East Europe, Central Europe Database, Publicly Available Content Database, Research Library China, ProQuest Research Library, ProQuest Central, Research Library (Alumni edition), ProQuest Social Sciences Premium Collection, ProQuest Sociology Collection, ProQuest Central (new), ProQuest Central K-12, ProQuest Central Korea, Research Library Prep, Social Science Premium Collection, Sociology Collection, ProQuest Central Essentials, ProQuest Central China, ProQuest One Academic, ProQuest One Literature
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    Titre: STRATIGRAPHY OF CULTURAL INTERACTION IN EURASIA BASED ON COMPUTING OF FOLKLORE MOTIFS
    Auteur: Berezkin, Yuri
    Sujet: Europe ; Eurasia ; Mythology ; Prehistoric Era ; Archaeology ; Folklore ; Human Relations ; Traditions ; Oral Tradition ; Spheres ; Folklore ; Areal Linguistics ; Prehistory ; Databases
    Description: The article operates with two categories of units selected from folklore and mythological texts. These are the A-motifs (images and episodes related to cosmology and etiology) and B-motifs (episodes related to adventures and tricks). The areal distribution of the A-motifs reflects the existence of interaction spheres that probably emerged in deep prehistory mostly thanks to the displacement and movement of people themselves and not only as a result of the exchange of narratives between populations. The areal distribution of the B-motifs was mostly due to cultural interaction though the movement of people also played its role. The comparison of the data on the distribution of the A- and B-motifs suggests that a change in the system of intercultural connections took place in Eurasia after ca. A.D. 500. The Caucasus (with the adjacent areas) that was earlier connected with Europe was absorbed into the same interaction sphere as Mongolia and Southern Siberia. A set of motifs shared by southern...
    Fait partie de: Trames : A Journal of the Humanities and Social Sciences, 2016, Vol.20(3), pp.217-227
    Identifiant: 14060922 (ISSN); 17367514 (E-ISSN); 10.3176/tr.2016.3.01 (DOI)

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    The Dog, the Horse and the Creation of Man

    Berezkin, Yuri E
    Folklore (Tartu, Estonia), 2014, Issue 56, pp.25-46 [Revue évaluée par les pairs]
    Central and Eastern European Online Library (C.E.E.O.L.)
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    Titre: The Dog, the Horse and the Creation of Man
    Auteur: Berezkin, Yuri E
    Sujet: Customs / Folklore ; Creation Myth ; Creation of Man ; Anthropology
    Description: A story that described the creation of man became known to at least some inhabitants of the Eurasian Steppe zone not later than the early II millennia B.C. Not a fragment of it survived across most of this area, and our reconstruction is based on the evidence from the areas to the north and to the south of the Steppe Belt. The texts in question share many specific details and the probability of their independent emergence looks negligible. At the same time the people to whom the story was familiar in the 19th and 20th century could definitely not have borrowed it from each other in recent times. The only way to reconstruct the mythology of the people who lived in the past is a search of its survivals in the later folklore. The analysis of ancient iconography or scraps of evidence preserved in the early written sources is not enough for the reconstruction of the plots of complex tales.
    Fait partie de: Folklore (Tartu, Estonia), 2014, Issue 56, pp.25-46
    Identifiant: 1406-0957 (ISSN); 1406-0949 (E-ISSN)

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    SPREAD OF FOLKLORE MOTIFS AS A PROXY FOR INFORMATION EXCHANGE: CONTACT ZONES

    Berezkin, Yuri E
    Trames (Tallinn), 2015, Vol.XIX(1) [Revue évaluée par les pairs]
    Central and Eastern European Online Library (C.E.E.O.L.)
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    Titre: SPREAD OF FOLKLORE MOTIFS AS A PROXY FOR INFORMATION EXCHANGE: CONTACT ZONES
    Auteur: Berezkin, Yuri E
    Sujet: Cultural History ; Folklore Databases, Folklore Indexes, Interaction Spheres, Cultural Borders, Eurasian Folklore ; Social Sciences (General)
    Description: The aim of this paper is to reveal patterns of areal spread of folklore motifs in Eurasia and to understand their rationale. The distribution of 615 motifs related to adventures and tricks according to 339 Old World traditions was statistically processed using factor analysis. Tendencies in the areal spread of motifs are interpreted as proxies for the intensity of information exchange between people. Two regularities in distribution of motifs deserve attention. Western Europe and the Mediterranean with adjacent Africa are contrasted with the Caucasus, Central Asia and Mongolia with adjacent Siberia. Finnish, Estonian, Latvian, Lithuanian, Byelorussian and Ukrainian traditions are strongly “European”, the folklore of the Crimea Tatars and especially of the Bashkir is strongly “Asiatic”, the folklore of the Gagauz, Volga Tatars, Mari, Udmurts and Komi moderately “Asiatic”, the Russians, the Setu, the Karelians and the Mordvinians are slightly on the “European” side while the Chuvash...
    Fait partie de: Trames (Tallinn), 2015, Vol.XIX(1)
    Identifiant: 1406-0922 (ISSN); 1736-7514 (E-ISSN)

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    Самодийская космонимия в сибирско-североамериканском контексте

    Berezkin, Yuri E
    Uralo-altaĭskie issledovanii͡a, 2018, Issue 2 (29), pp.18-29
    Central and Eastern European Online Library (C.E.E.O.L.)
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    Titre: Самодийская космонимия в сибирско-североамериканском контексте
    Auteur: Berezkin, Yuri E
    Sujet: Language Studies ; Language and Literature Studies ; Theoretical Linguistics ; Applied Linguistics ; Finno-Ugrian Studies ; Cultural Anthropology / Ethnology ; Ethnoastronomy ; Mythology of Siberian Peoples ; Myth and Language ; Settlement of America ; Statistical Methods in Humanitarian Studies
    Description: Data on the cosmonymy of the peoples speaking (mostly Northern) Samoyedic languages are compared with the data on other Siberian and North American traditions. Statistical processing of the complete set of mythological motifs recorded in Siberia as well as tracing of the spread of particular interpretations related to stellar objects and spots on the Moon demonstrate that, for languages belonging to different branches of particular families, similarity between sets of motifs is not higher than that for totally unrelated languages. Such similarities mostly correlate with geographic nearness and shared sets of ethnographic traits. Most of Samoyedic and other Siberian cosmonyms find parallels in the North American North and West (but not further to the South). To be brought there, the corresponding motifs must have been known in Siberia at the time when the last groups of migrants began to move to the New World (terminal Pleistocene — early Holocene). The recognized linguistic reconstructions...
    Fait partie de: Uralo-altaĭskie issledovanii͡a, 2018, Issue 2 (29), pp.18-29
    Identifiant: 2079-1003 (ISSN)

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    Tricksters Trot to America: Areal Distribution of Folklore Motifs

    Berezkin, Yuri E
    Folklore (Tartu, Estonia), 2010, Issue 46, pp.125-142 [Revue évaluée par les pairs]
    Central and Eastern European Online Library (C.E.E.O.L.)
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    Titre: Tricksters Trot to America: Areal Distribution of Folklore Motifs
    Auteur: Berezkin, Yuri E
    Sujet: Customs / Folklore ; Comparative Folklore and Mythology ; Peopling of America ; Prehistoric Migrations ; Trickster ; Anthropology
    Description: The folklore Trickster is usually considered a universally known combination of features intrinsic to human nature. However, there are strong anomalies in the areal distribution of such a figure. Sub-Saharan Africa, North America (except for the Arctic), Northeast Asia and South American Chaco not only are the preferred zones of tricksters’ activity but also share some peculiar trickster motifs unknown in most of the other regions. The range of animals which play the role of tricksters is also restricted and not always easily explained, E.g. the Hare and Spider, known in both Africa and North America, are neither “mediators” between life and death (suggested by C. Lévi-Strauss for Coyote) nor “really tricky” (“materialistic” hypothesis of M. Harris). The set of trickster motifs and the zoo- or anthropomorphic impersonations of the Trickster are independent variables. The same episodes are easily linked to different tricksters while every trickster usually attracts episodes characteristic...
    Fait partie de: Folklore (Tartu, Estonia), 2010, Issue 46, pp.125-142
    Identifiant: 1406-0957 (ISSN); 1406-0949 (E-ISSN)

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    The Pleiades as Openings, The Milky Way as the Path of Birds, and The Girl On the Moon: cultural links across Northern Eurasia

    Berezkin, Yuri E
    Folklore (Tartu, Estonia), 2010, Issue 44, pp.7-34 [Revue évaluée par les pairs]
    Central and Eastern European Online Library (C.E.E.O.L.)
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    Titre: The Pleiades as Openings, The Milky Way as the Path of Birds, and The Girl On the Moon: cultural links across Northern Eurasia
    Auteur: Berezkin, Yuri E
    Sujet: Customs / Folklore ; Asianamerican Cosmonymic Links ; Folk Astronomy ; Lunar Spots ; Prehistory of Northern Eurasia ; the Milky Way ; the Pleiades ; Anthropology
    Description: The Baltic-Finnish and the Baltic (Latvian and Lithuanian) cosmonyms mostly coincide while the Baltic and Slavic cosmonymic patterns are different. The Pleiades in the Eastern Baltic are ‘a sieve’, the Milky Way is ‘the path of migratory birds’ and a girl holding water pails is seen on the Moon. Across most of Central, Western and Southern Europe the Pleiades are ‘a hen with its chicken’, the Milky Way and the lunar spots have other (and different) interpretations. The Eastern Baltic pattern is identical with the Middle Volga one where it is widespread among both Finnish-Permian and Turkic groups and probably relates back to the (Proto-Baltic?) culture of the Iron Age. However, parallels for the cosmonyms in question are found across most of Northern Eurasia and find corresponding similarities in some parts of North America.‘Water-carrier on the Moon’ is the most widespread of these motifs being known in Japan and Polynesia. In Eurasia, the Northern Samoyeds noticeably lack all...
    Fait partie de: Folklore (Tartu, Estonia), 2010, Issue 44, pp.7-34
    Identifiant: 1406-0957 (ISSN); 1406-0949 (E-ISSN)

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    Plejaadid kui taevaavad, Linnutee ja neiu Kuul: kultuuriseosed Põhja-Euraasias

    Berezkin, Yuri E
    Mäetagused, 2010, Issue 46, pp.7-36 [Revue évaluée par les pairs]
    Central and Eastern European Online Library (C.E.E.O.L.)
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    Titre: Plejaadid kui taevaavad, Linnutee ja neiu Kuul: kultuuriseosed Põhja-Euraasias
    Auteur: Berezkin, Yuri E
    Sujet: Customs / Folklore ; Asianamerican Cosmonymic Links ; Folk Astronomy ; Lunar Spots ; Prehistory of Northern Eurasia ; the Milky Way ; the Pleiades ; Anthropology
    Description: The Baltic-Finnish and the Baltic (Latvian and Lithuanian) cosmonyms mostly coincide while the Baltic and Slavic cosmonymic patterns are different. The Pleiades in the Eastern Baltic are “a sieve”, the Milky Way is “the path of migratory birds” and a girl holding water pails is seen on the Moon. Across most of Central, Western and Southern Europe the Pleiades are “a hen with its chicken”, the Milky Way and the lunar spots have other (and different) interpretations. The Eastern Baltic pattern is identical with the Middle Volga one where it is widespread among both Finnish-Permian and Turkic groups and probably relates back to the (Proto-Baltic?) culture of the Iron Age. However, parallels for the cosmonyms in question are found across most of Northern Eurasia and find corresponding similarities in some parts of North America. “Water-carrier on the Moon” is the most widespread of these motifs being known in Japan and Polynesia. In Eurasia, the Northern Samoyeds noticeably lack all...
    Fait partie de: Mäetagused, 2010, Issue 46, pp.7-36
    Identifiant: 1406-992X (ISSN); 1406-9938 (E-ISSN)

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    The Captive Khan and the Clever Daughter-in-Law

    Berezkin, Yuri E, Duvakin, Evgeny
    Folklore (Tartu, Estonia), 2016, Issue 64, pp.33-56 [Revue évaluée par les pairs]
    Central and Eastern European Online Library (C.E.E.O.L.)
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    Titre: The Captive Khan and the Clever Daughter-in-Law
    Auteur: Berezkin, Yuri E; Duvakin, Evgeny
    Sujet: Customs / Folklore ; Cultural Anthropology / Ethnology ; Culture and Social Structure ; Cultural and Historical Links ; Eurasian Steppe Belt ; Folklore Databases ; Folktales ; Anthropology
    Description: The Aarne-Thompson-Uther index contains rich data on the tale repertoire of the main areas of Eurasia and North Africa, but it is still Eurocentric, and does not reflect many widespread tale-types that are not registered in Europe or rarely found across the region. We have revealed several plots of such kind. Their distribution seems to point to the eastern part of the Great Steppe as the area of their origin. Later on waves of nomads might have brought these plots to Europe. In this article, two of them are analysed in detail: The Encoded Message (that includes rather different versions) and The Big Bull. Both find correspondences in Balto-Finnic traditions, which allows us to discuss them in the context of previously unrecognised or poorly studied parallels between the Caucasus and Northern Europe. The approximate date of these links is the second part of the first millennium A.D.
    Fait partie de: Folklore (Tartu, Estonia), 2016, Issue 64, pp.33-56
    Identifiant: 1406-0957 (ISSN); 1406-0949 (E-ISSN)

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    ANNEX. A LARGE-SCALE STUDY OF WORLD MYTHS

    Thuillard, Marc, Le Quellec, Jean-Loïc, D’huy, Julien, Berezkin, Yuri E
    Trames (Tallinn), 2018, Vol.XXII(4), pp.1-44 [Revue évaluée par les pairs]
    Central and Eastern European Online Library (C.E.E.O.L.)
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    Titre: ANNEX. A LARGE-SCALE STUDY OF WORLD MYTHS
    Auteur: Thuillard, Marc; Le Quellec, Jean-Loïc; D’huy, Julien; Berezkin, Yuri E
    Sujet: Anthropology ; World Mythology ; Anthropology ; Social Sciences (General)
    Fait partie de: Trames (Tallinn), 2018, Vol.XXII(4), pp.1-44
    Identifiant: 1406-0922 (ISSN); 1736-7514 (E-ISSN)