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    • Film
    Sélectionner

    Twentieth century fox : les 50 premières années : les coulisses du studio mythique d'Hollywood

    Burns, Kevin
    [Lieu de publication non identifié] : Twentieth Century Fox Home Entertainment
    2002
    Recherche de la disponibilité
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    Titre: Twentieth century fox : les 50 premières années : les coulisses du studio mythique d'Hollywood / written by Kevin Burns
    Auteur: Burns, Kevin
    Editeur: [Lieu de publication non identifié] : Twentieth Century Fox Home Entertainment
    Date: 2002
    Collation: 1 DVD-vidéo
    Sujet RERO: 1915-1965 - Cinéma américain - Twentieth Century Fox (Etats-Unis)
    Sujet RERO - forme: [DVD vidéo]
    Note: Langue: Anglais. Sous-titres: Français - Titre original: Twentieth Century Fox, the first 50 years
    No RERO: R005107272
    Permalien:
    http://data.rero.ch/01-R005107272/html

    • Article
    Sélectionner

    Computing the creativeness of amusing advertisements: A Bayesian model of Burma-Shave's muse

    Burns, Kevin
    Artificial Intelligence for Engineering Design, Analysis and Manufacturing, 2015, Vol.29(1), pp.109-128 [Revue évaluée par les pairs]
    Cambridge University Press
    Disponible
    Plus…
    Titre: Computing the creativeness of amusing advertisements: A Bayesian model of Burma-Shave's muse
    Auteur: Burns, Kevin
    Echelle: 2015
    Collection: 20141202
    Sujet: Regular Articles; Aesthetics; Bayesian; Creativity; Information; Semantics
    Description: Abstract How do humans judge the creativeness of an artwork or other artifact? This article suggests that such judgments are based on the pleasures of an aesthetic experience, which can be modeled as a mathematical product of psychological arousal and appraisal. The arousal stems from surprise, and is computed as a marginal entropy using information theory. The appraisal assigns meaning, by which the surprise is resolved, and is computed as a posterior probability using Bayesian theory. This model is tested by obtaining human ratings of surprise, meaning, and creativeness for artifacts in a domain of advertising design. The empirical results show that humans do judge creativeness as a product of surprise and meaning, consistent with the computational model of arousal and appraisal. Implications of the model are discussed with respect to advancing artificial intelligence in the arts as well as improving the computational evaluation of creativity in engineering and design.
    Précédemment: 20142015120202
    Fait partie de: Artificial Intelligence for Engineering Design, Analysis and Manufacturing, 2015, Vol.29(1), pp.109-128
    Classement: 201502
    Identifiant: 0890-0604 (ISSN); 1469-1760 (E-ISSN); 10.1017/S0890060414000699 (DOI)

    • Article
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    Radial distributions of air plants: a comparison between epiphytes and mistletoes

    Taylor, Amanda, Burns, Kevin
    Ecology, April 2016, Vol.97(4), pp.819-25 [Revue évaluée par les pairs]
    MEDLINE/PubMed (U.S. National Library of Medicine)
    Disponible
    Plus…
    Titre: Radial distributions of air plants: a comparison between epiphytes and mistletoes
    Auteur: Taylor, Amanda; Burns, Kevin
    Sujet: Forests ; Humidity ; Light ; Magnoliopsida -- Physiology
    Description: Vertical gradients of light and humidity within forest canopies are major predictors of air plant distributions. Although this pattern was first recognized over 120 years ago, few studies have considered an additional axis of resource availability, which exists radially around the trunks of trees. Here, we explored the radial distributions of mistletoes and epiphytes in relation to gradients of light and humidity around the trunks of their south-temperate host trees. Additionally, we correlated microclimate occupancy with plant physiological responses to shifting resource availability. The radial distributions of mistletoes and epiphytes were highly directional, and related to the availability of light and humidity, respectively. Mistletoes oriented northwest, parallel to gradients of higher light intensity, temperature, and lower humidity. Comparatively, epiphytes oriented away from the sun to the southeast. The rate of CO2 assimilation in mistletoes and photochemical efficiency of epiphytes...
    Fait partie de: Ecology, April 2016, Vol.97(4), pp.819-25
    Identifiant: 0012-9658 (ISSN); 27220198 Version (PMID)

    • Article
    Sélectionner

    Adaptive advantages of appearance: predation, thermoregulation, and color of webbing built by New Zealand's largest moth

    Yule, Kirsty, Burns, Kevin
    Ecology, May 2017, Vol.98(5), pp.1324-1333 [Revue évaluée par les pairs]
    MEDLINE/PubMed (U.S. National Library of Medicine)
    Disponible
    Plus…
    Titre: Adaptive advantages of appearance: predation, thermoregulation, and color of webbing built by New Zealand's largest moth
    Auteur: Yule, Kirsty; Burns, Kevin
    Sujet: Hepialidae ; Lepidoptera ; Camouflage ; Color ; Conspicuous ; Defense ; Parrot ; Predator-Prey Interactions ; Moths -- Physiology
    Description: Prey are often difficult to locate visually, which may help them avoid predators. However, an animal's appearance might also evolve in response to the abiotic environment. Here, we investigate the processes that determine the appearance of silk webbing built by New Zealand's largest endemic moth Aenetus virescens (Lepidoptera: Hepialidae), whose larvae burrow into the trunks of native trees. Larvae cover tunnel entrances with silk webbing, detritus, and epiphytes, giving them a similar appearance to tree bark. First, we conducted spectral analyses of webbing and background bark in avian tetrahedral color space to test whether webbing made larvae less visible to predatory parrots. Next, we manipulated the spectral contrast of webbing and background bark and assessed its effect on predation by parrots for over 2 yr. Last, we measured the effect of webbing on tunnel temperatures and quantified how temperatures within tunnels affected larval growth. Results indicate that webbing made larvae...
    Fait partie de: Ecology, May 2017, Vol.98(5), pp.1324-1333
    Identifiant: 0012-9658 (ISSN); 28247920 Version (PMID); 10.1002/ecy.1787 (DOI)

    • Article
    Sélectionner

    Closely related bird species demonstrate flexibility between beak morphology and underlying developmental programs

    Mallarino, Ricardo, Campàs, Otger, Fritz, Joerg A., Burns, Kevin J., Weeks, Olivia G., Brenner, Michael P., Abzhanov, Arhat
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 2 October 2012, Vol.109(40), pp.16222-16227 [Revue évaluée par les pairs]
    Archival Journals (JSTOR)
    Disponible
    Plus…
    Titre: Closely related bird species demonstrate flexibility between beak morphology and underlying developmental programs
    Auteur: Mallarino, Ricardo; Campàs, Otger; Fritz, Joerg A.; Burns, Kevin J.; Weeks, Olivia G.; Brenner, Michael P.; Abzhanov, Arhat
    Sujet: Convergent Evolution -- Research ; Beak -- Physiological Aspects ; Fringillidae -- Physiological Aspects ; Fringillidae -- Natural History ; Developmental Biology -- Research;
    Description: The astonishing variation in the shape and size of bird beaks reflects a wide range of dietary specializations that played an important role in avian diversification. Among Darwin's finches, ground finches (Geospiza spp.) have beaks that represent scaling variations of the same shape, which are generated by alterations in the signaling pathways that regulate growth of the two skeletal components of the beak: the prenasal cartilage (pnc) and the premaxillary bone (pmx). Whether this developmental mechanism is responsible for variation within groups of other closely related bird species, however, has remained unknown. Here, we report that the Caribbean bullfinches (Loxigilla spp.), which are closely related to Darwin's finches, have independently evolved beaks of a novel shape, different from Geospiza. but also varying from each other only in scaling. However, despite sharing the same beak shape, the signaling pathways and tissues patterning Loxigilla beaks differ among the three species. In Loxigilla noctis. as in Geospiza, the pnc develops first, shaped by Bmp4 and CaM signaling, followed by the development of the pmx, regulated by TGFβllr. β-catenin, and Dkk3 signaling. In contrast beak morphogenesis in Loxigilla violacea and Loxigilla portoricensis is generated almost exclusively by the pmx through a mechanism in which Ihh and Bmp4 synergize to promote expansion of bone tissue. Together, our results demonstrate high flexibility in the relationship between morphology and underlying developmental causes, where different developmental programs can generate identical shapes, and similar developmental programs can pattern different shapes.
    Fait partie de: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 2 October 2012, Vol.109(40), pp.16222-16227
    Identifiant: 00278424 (ISSN)

    • Article
    Sélectionner

    Plant composition patterns inside an endemic birds’ nest fern ( Asplenium goudeyi ) on Lord Howe Island: effects of fern size, fern isolation and plant dispersal abilities

    Taylor, Amanda, Burns, Kevin
    Journal of Tropical Ecology, 2015, Vol.31(5), pp.413-421 [Revue évaluée par les pairs]
    Cambridge University Press
    Disponible
    Plus…
    Titre: Plant composition patterns inside an endemic birds’ nest fern ( Asplenium goudeyi ) on Lord Howe Island: effects of fern size, fern isolation and plant dispersal abilities
    Auteur: Taylor, Amanda; Burns, Kevin
    Echelle: 2015
    Collection: 20150729
    Sujet: Birds’ Nest Fern; Community Composition; Dispersal; Isolation; Lord Howe Island
    Description: The importance of deterministic and stochastic processes in structuring ecological communities is an enduring debate. Although this debate is nearly a century old, the extent to which communities are structured by species interactions or chance events is a central issue in ecology. We examined the assemblages of plants living inside 119 birds’ nest ferns ( Asplenium goudeyi ), which are endemic to Lord Howe Island. Specifically, we investigated whether patterns of species richness and community composition were influenced by fern size, fern isolation and plant dispersal abilities. Fern size and fern isolation significantly predicted plant community richness. At the community level, plant composition patterns did not deviate from randomized expectations. Individual species occurrences increased with increasing community richness, and no species exclusions were observed. Wind-dispersed taxa, which accounted for 29% of all species, were well represented in isolated ferns. Comparatively, poorer dispersers were confined to ferns nearest the forest at the base of the cliffs. We suggest that dispersal plays a key role in structuring plant communities living within birds’ nest ferns, and that species interactions are less important. Our study emphasizes the importance of epiphytes with a nest-like growth form as habitat for plants in a harsh environment.
    Précédemment: 20152015070929
    Fait partie de: Journal of Tropical Ecology, 2015, Vol.31(5), pp.413-421
    Classement: 201509
    Identifiant: 0266-4674 (ISSN); 1469-7831 (E-ISSN); 10.1017/S0266467415000334 (DOI)

    • Plusieurs versions

    Characterization of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 Ectodomain Shedding from Mouse Proximal Tubular Cells (ACE2 Shedding in Mouse PT Cells)

    Xiao, Fengxia, Zimpelmann, Joseph, Agaybi, Samih, Gurley, Susan B, Puente, Lawrence, Burns, Kevin D
    2014, Vol.9(1), p.e85958 [Revue évaluée par les pairs]

    • Plusieurs versions

    Increased Urinary Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 in Renal Transplant Patients with Diabetes (Urinary ACE2 in Renal Transplants)

    Xiao, Fengxia, Hiremath, Swapnil, Knoll, Greg, Zimpelmann, Joseph, Srivaratharajah, Kajenny, Jadhav, Deepak, Fergusson, Dean, Kennedy, Chris R. J, Burns, Kevin D
    PLoS ONE, 2012, Vol.7(5), p.e37649 [Revue évaluée par les pairs]

    • Article
    Sélectionner

    A Theory of Island Biogeography for Exotic Species

    Burns, Kevin C
    The American naturalist, October 2015, Vol.186(4), pp.441-51 [Revue évaluée par les pairs]
    MEDLINE/PubMed (U.S. National Library of Medicine)
    Disponible
    Plus…
    Titre: A Theory of Island Biogeography for Exotic Species
    Auteur: Burns, Kevin C
    Sujet: Biodiversity ; Introduced Species ; Islands ; Plants
    Description: The theory of island biogeography has played a pivotal role in the way ecologists view communities. However, it does not account for exotic species explicitly, which limits its use as a conservation tool. Here, I present the results of a long-term study of plant communities inhabiting an archipelago of small islands off the coast of New Zealand and derive a modified version of the theory of island biogeography to predict differences in the turnover and diversity of native and exotic species. Empirical results showed that, although species richness of both native and exotic plant species increased with island area, native species consistently outnumbered exotic species. Species turnover increased with species richness in both groups. However, opposite to species-area patterns, turnover increased more rapidly with species richness in exotic species. Empirical results were consistent with the modified version of the theory of island biogeography, which distinguishes exotic species from native...
    Fait partie de: The American naturalist, October 2015, Vol.186(4), pp.441-51
    Identifiant: 1537-5323 (E-ISSN); 26655568 Version (PMID); 10.1086/682934 (DOI)

    • Plusieurs versions

    C-peptide as a Therapy for Kidney Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Shaw, James A, Shetty, Partha, Burns, Kevin D, Fergusson, Dean, Knoll, Greg A
    PloS one, 2015, Vol.10(5), pp.e0127439 [Revue évaluée par les pairs]