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    Surmonter la boulimie, la suralimentation et le binge eating

    Cooper, Peter J
    Paris : Dunod
    2013
    Recherche de la disponibilité
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    Titre: Surmonter la boulimie, la suralimentation et le binge eating / Peter J. Cooper
    Auteur: Cooper, Peter J
    Editeur: Paris : Dunod
    Date: 2013
    Collation: 172 p : ill.
    Collection: Mon cahier d'accompagnement
    Documents dans cette collection: Mon cahier d'accompagnement
    Sujet RERO: Boulimie - Troubles du comportement alimentaire
    Sujet RERO - forme: [Guides pratiques]
    Sujet MeSH: Behavior Therapy - Binge-Eating Disorder ‐‐ therapy - Bulimia ‐‐ therapy - Cognitive Therapy - Feeding and Eating Disorders ‐‐ therapy - Psychopathology
    Contient: [Sommaire] 1. D'abord bien comprendre de quoi nous parlons avant d'agir: Suralimentation compulsive, boulimie nerveuse et binge eating. - Comment ces troubles affectent la vie quotidienne. - Les complications physiques. - Les causes. - 2. Comment surmonter son problème au quotidien: Contrôler votre alimentation. - Etablir un planning des repas. - Apprendre à intervenir. - Résoudre les problèmes. - Eliminer tout régime. - Modifier votre état d'esprit
    Identifiant: 9782100701285 (ISBN); http://catalogue.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/cb436732072 (URN)
    No RERO: R007505385
    Permalien:
    http://data.rero.ch/01-R007505385/html

    • Plusieurs versions

    Attempting to prevent postnatal depression by targeting the mother–infant relationship: a randomised controlled trial

    Cooper, Peter J, De Pascalis, Leonardo, Woolgar, Matthew, Romaniuk, Helena, Murray, Lynne
    Primary Health Care Research & Development, 2015, Vol.16(4), pp.383-397 [Revue évaluée par les pairs]

    • Article
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    Insecure attachment during infancy predicts greater amygdala volumes in early adulthood

    Moutsiana, Christina, Johnstone, Tom, Murray, Lynne, Fearon, Pasco, Cooper, Peter J., Pliatsikas, Christos, Goodyer, Ian, Halligan, Sarah L.
    Moutsiana, Christina and Johnstone, Tom and Murray, Lynne and Fearon, Pasco and Cooper, Peter J. and Pliatsikas, Christos and Goodyer, Ian and Halligan, Sarah L. (2014) Insecure attachment during infancy predicts greater amygdala volumes in early adulthood. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, . [Revue évaluée par les pairs]
    University of Kent
    Disponible
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    Titre: Insecure attachment during infancy predicts greater amygdala volumes in early adulthood
    Auteur: Moutsiana, Christina; Johnstone, Tom; Murray, Lynne; Fearon, Pasco; Cooper, Peter J.; Pliatsikas, Christos; Goodyer, Ian; Halligan, Sarah L.
    Sujet: BF Psychology
    Description: Background The quality of the early environment is hypothesized to be an influence on morphological development in key neural areas related to affective responding, but direct evidence to support this possibility is limited. In a 22-year longitudinal study, we examined hippocampal and amygdala volumes in adulthood in relation to early infant attachment status, an important indicator of the quality of the early caregiving environment. Methods Participants (N = 59) were derived from a prospective longitudinal study of the impact of maternal postnatal depression on child development. Infant attachment status (24 Secure; 35 Insecure) was observed at 18 months of age, and MRI assessments were completed at 22 years. Results In line with hypotheses, insecure versus secure infant attachment status was associated with larger amygdala volumes in young adults, an effect that was not accounted for by maternal depression history. We did not find early infant attachment status to predict hippocampal volumes. Conclusions Common variations in the quality of early environment are associated with gross alterations in amygdala morphology in the adult brain. Further research is required to establish the neural changes that underpin the volumetric differences reported here, and any functional implications.
    Fait partie de: Moutsiana, Christina and Johnstone, Tom and Murray, Lynne and Fearon, Pasco and Cooper, Peter J. and Pliatsikas, Christos and Goodyer, Ian and Halligan, Sarah L. (2014) Insecure attachment during infancy predicts greater amygdala volumes in early adulthood. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, .
    Identifiant: 0021-9630 (ISSN)

    • Article
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    Promoting Mother-Infant Book Sharing and Infant Attention and Language Development in an Impoverished South African Population: A Pilot Study

    Cooper, Peter J, Vally, Zahir, Cooper, Hallam, Radford, Theo, Sharples, Arthur, Tomlinson, Mark, Murray, Lynne
    Early childhood education journal, March 2014, Vol.42(2), p.143 [Revue évaluée par les pairs]
    ERIC (U.S. Dept. of Education)
    Disponible
    Plus…
    Titre: Promoting Mother-Infant Book Sharing and Infant Attention and Language Development in an Impoverished South African Population: A Pilot Study
    Auteur: Cooper, Peter J; Vally, Zahir; Cooper, Hallam; Radford, Theo; Sharples, Arthur; Tomlinson, Mark; Murray, Lynne
    Sujet: Foreign Countries ; Poverty ; Parent Education ; Reading Aloud to Others ; Infants ; Toddlers ; Parent Child Relationship ; Cognitive Development ; Language Acquisition ; Comparative Analysis ; Experimental Groups ; Control Groups ; Toys ; Play ; Attention Span ; Mothers ; Training ; Program Effectiveness ; South Africa ; Education
    Description: The low rates of child literacy in South Africa are cause for considerable concern. Research from the developed world shows that parental sharing of picture books with infants and young children is beneficial for child language and cognitive development, as well as literacy skills. We conducted a pilot study to examine whether such benefits might extend to an impoverished community in South Africa, by evaluating the impact of training mothers in book sharing with their 14-18 month old infants. Seventeen mothers received book sharing training; and 13 mothers did not, but instead received a comparison training in toy play. We assessed the mothers' behavior during both book sharing and toy play before and after training, and we also assessed infant attention and language. Mothers receiving book sharing training engaged well with it, and they also benefited from it; thus, compared to the comparison group mothers, they became more sensitive, more facilitating, and more elaborative...
    Fait partie de: Early childhood education journal, March 2014, Vol.42(2), p.143
    Identifiant: 1082-3301 (ISSN); 1573-1707 (E-ISSN); 10.1007/s10643-013-0591-8 (DOI)

    • Plusieurs versions

    The association between childhood feeding problems and maternal eating disorder: a community study

    Whelan, Elizabeth, Cooper, Peter J.
    Psychological Medicine, 2000, Vol.30(1), pp.69-77 [Revue évaluée par les pairs]

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    EDITORIAL: Postpartum depression and child development

    Murray, Lynne, Cooper, Peter J.
    Psychological Medicine, 1997, Vol.27(2), pp.253-260 [Revue évaluée par les pairs]
    Cambridge University Press
    Disponible
    Plus…
    Titre: EDITORIAL: Postpartum depression and child development
    Auteur: Murray, Lynne; Cooper, Peter J.
    Sujet: Medicine;
    Description: Depression has a profound impact on parameters of interpersonal behaviour (Lewinsohn . 1970; Libert Lewinsohn, 1973; Teasdale . 1980). Studies of healthy motherinfant dyads have demonstrated that infants are highly sensitive to their interpersonal environment (Murray, 1988). It is, therefore, likely that postpartum depression, by virtue of its impact on maternal interpersonal functioning, will disrupt normal infant engagements with the mother and, as a consequence, impair infant developmental progress. In recent years a considerable body of research surrounding this question has accumulated.
    Fait partie de: Psychological Medicine, 1997, Vol.27(2), pp.253-260
    Identifiant: 0033-2917 (ISSN)

    • Plusieurs versions

    Socially anxious mothers' narratives to their children and their relation to child representations and adjustment

    Cicchetti, Dante, Natsuaki, Misaki N, Murray, Lynne, Pella, Jeff E, De Pascalis, Leonardo, Arteche, Adriane, Pass, Laura, Percy, Ray, Creswell, Catharine, Cooper, Peter J
    Development and Psychopathology, 2014, Vol.26(4pt2), pp.1531-1546 [Revue évaluée par les pairs]

    • Article
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    Controlled trial of the short- and long-term effect of psychological treatment of post-partum depression: 2. Impact on the mother-child relationship and child outcome

    Murray, Lynne, Cooper, Peter J, Wilson, Anji, Romaniuk, Helena
    The British journal of psychiatry : the journal of mental science, May 2003, Vol.182, pp.420-7 [Revue évaluée par les pairs]
    MEDLINE/PubMed (U.S. National Library of Medicine)
    Disponible
    Plus…
    Titre: Controlled trial of the short- and long-term effect of psychological treatment of post-partum depression: 2. Impact on the mother-child relationship and child outcome
    Auteur: Murray, Lynne; Cooper, Peter J; Wilson, Anji; Romaniuk, Helena
    Sujet: Child Development ; Mother-Child Relations ; Depression, Postpartum -- Therapy ; Psychotherapy -- Methods
    Description: Postnatal depression is associated with adverse child cognitive and socio-emotional outcome. It is not known whether psychological treatment affects the quality of the mother-child relationship and child outcome. To evaluate the effect of three psychological treatments on the mother-child relationship and child outcome. Women with post-partum depression (n=193) were assigned randomly to routine primary care, non-directive counselling, cognitive-behavioural therapy or psychodynamic therapy. The women and their children were assessed at 4.5, 18 and 60 months post-partum. Indications of a positive benefit were limited. All three treatments had a significant benefit on maternal reports of early difficulties in relationships with the infants; counselling gave better infant emotional and behaviour ratings at 18 months and more sensitive early mother-infant interactions. The treatments had no significant impact on maternal management of early infant behaviour problems, security of infant-mother attachment, infant cognitive development or any child outcome at 5 years. Early intervention was of short-term benefit to the mother-child relationship and infant behaviour problems. More-prolonged intervention may be needed. Health visitors could deliver this.
    Fait partie de: The British journal of psychiatry : the journal of mental science, May 2003, Vol.182, pp.420-7
    Identifiant: 0007-1250 (ISSN); 12724245 Version (PMID)

    • Article
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    Controlled trial of the short- and long-term effect of psychological treatment of post-partum depression. I. Impact on maternal mood

    Cooper, Peter J, Murray, Lynne, Wilson, Anji, Romaniuk, Helena
    The British journal of psychiatry : the journal of mental science, May 2003, Vol.182, pp.412-9 [Revue évaluée par les pairs]
    MEDLINE/PubMed (U.S. National Library of Medicine)
    Disponible
    Plus…
    Titre: Controlled trial of the short- and long-term effect of psychological treatment of post-partum depression. I. Impact on maternal mood
    Auteur: Cooper, Peter J; Murray, Lynne; Wilson, Anji; Romaniuk, Helena
    Sujet: Depression, Postpartum -- Therapy ; Psychotherapy -- Methods
    Description: Psychological interventions for postnatal depression can be beneficial in the short term but their longer-term impact is unknown. To evaluate the long-term effect on maternal mood of three psychological treatments in relation to routine primary care. Women with post-partum depression (n=193) were assigned randomly to one of four conditions: routine primary care, non-directive counselling, cognitive-behavioural therapy or psychodynamic therapy. They were assessed immediately after the treatment phase (at 4.5 months) and at 9, 18 and 60 months post-partum. Compared with the control, all three treatments had a significant impact at 4.5 months on maternal mood (Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale, EPDS). Only psychodynamic therapy produced a rate of reduction in depression (Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-III - R) significantly superior to that of the control. The benefit of treatment was no longer apparent by 9 months post-partum. Treatment did not reduce subsequent episodes of post-partum depression. Psychological intervention for post-partum depression improves maternal mood (EPDS) in the short term. However, this benefit is not superior to spontaneous remission in the long term.
    Fait partie de: The British journal of psychiatry : the journal of mental science, May 2003, Vol.182, pp.412-9
    Identifiant: 0007-1250 (ISSN); 12724244 Version (PMID)

    • Plusieurs versions

    Effects of postnatal depression on infant development

    Murray, Lynne, Cooper, Peter J
    Archives of Disease in Childhood, 1 August 1997, Vol.77(2), p.99 [Revue évaluée par les pairs]