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    Titre: Bacterial community associated with the rhizosphere of wheat : interactions with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and selection of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria for the increase of wheat growth and soil health in Indian marginal rainfed fields / David Roesti
    Auteur: Roesti, David
    Editeur: Neuchâtel : Université de Neuchâtel, Institut de botanique
    Date: 2005
    Collation: 179 p. : ill. ; 30 cm
    Note: Existe aussi en version électronique, cyberthèse - Th. bot. Neuchâtel, 2005
    No RERO: R003814101
    Existe sous différentes formes: Bacterial community associated with the rhizosphere of wheat
    Permalien:
    http://data.rero.ch/01-R003814101/html

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    Plant growth stage, fertiliser management and bio-inoculation of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and plant growth promoting rhizobacteria affect the rhizobacterial community structure in rain-fed wheat fields

    Roesti, David
    Gaur, Rachna, Johri, B. N, Imfeld, G, Sharma, S, Kawaljeet, K, Aragno, Michel
    Soil Biology and Biochemistry. - 2006/38/5/1111-1120
    2006
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    Titre: Plant growth stage, fertiliser management and bio-inoculation of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and plant growth promoting rhizobacteria affect the rhizobacterial community structure in rain-fed wheat fields
    Auteur: Roesti, David
    Contributeur: Gaur, Rachna; Johri, B. N; Imfeld, G; Sharma, S; Kawaljeet, K; Aragno, Michel
    Date: 2006
    Sujet: Wheat - Rhizosphere - Growth stage - PGPR - AMF - DGGE
    Description: The goal of this study was first to assess the dynamics of the bacterial community during a growing season in three Indian rain-fed wheat fields which differ mainly through their fertilizer management and yield and then to study the effects of PGPR/AMF bio-inoculations on the bacterial community structure and wheat growth. The bacterial community structure of the rhizosphere soil (RS) and the rhizoplane/endorhizosphere (RE) was determined by PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Seed treatments consisted of consortia of two PGPR strains alone or combined with AMF or AMF alone. The PGPR strains were Pseudomonas spp. which included some or all of the following plant growth promoting properties: phosphate solubilisation and production of indole-3-acetic acid, siderophores, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase and diacetyl-phloroglucinol. The mycorrhizal inoculum was an indigenous AMF consortium isolated from the field with the lowest level of fertilization and yield. Variation partitioning analysis of the DGGE data indicated a predominant effect of the wheat growth stage (30.4% of the variance, P=0.001) over the type of field (9.0%, P=0.027) on the bacterial community structure in the RE. The impact of plant age in the RS was less than in the RE and the bacterial community structure of the field with the highest input of fertilization was very different from the low input fields. The bio-inoculants induced a significant modification in the bacterial community structure. In the RS, the bacterial consortia explained 28.3% (P=0.001) and the presence of AMF 10.6% (P=0.02) of the variance and the same trend was observed in the RE. Plant yield or grain quality was either increased or remained unaffected. For example, protein content was significantly higher in the treated plants' grain compared to the control plants; maximum values were obtained when the PGPR were co-inoculated with the AMF. The percentage of root colonization by AMF was significantly higher in the treatments containing a mycorrhizal inoculum than in the untreated control and remained unaffected by the PGPR treatments. In conclusion, the wheat rhizobacterial community structure is highly dynamic and influenced by different factors such as the plant's age, the fertilizer input and the type of bio-inoculant. In addition, there is a distance-related effect of the root on the bacterial community. Finally, a combined bio-inoculation of diacetyl-phloroglucinol producing PGPR strains and AMF can synergistically improve the nutritional quality of the grain without negatively affecting mycorrhizal growth.
    Publication en relation: Soil Biology and Biochemistry. - 2006/38/5/1111-1120
    Document hôte: Soil Biology and Biochemistry
    Identifiant: 10.1016/j.soilbio.2005.09.010 (DOI)

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    Bacteria Associated with Spores of the Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi Glomus geosporum and Glomus constrictum

    Roesti, David
    Ineichen, Kurt, Braissant, Olivier, Redecker, Dirk, Wiemken, Andres, Aragno, Michel
    Applied and Environmental Microbiology. - 2005/71/6673-6679
    2005
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    Titre: Bacteria Associated with Spores of the Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi Glomus geosporum and Glomus constrictum
    Auteur: Roesti, David
    Contributeur: Ineichen, Kurt; Braissant, Olivier; Redecker, Dirk; Wiemken, Andres; Aragno, Michel
    Date: 2005
    Description: Spores of the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) Glomus geosporum and Glomus constrictum were harvested from single-spore-derived pot cultures with either Plantago lanceolata or Hieracium pilosella as host plants. PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis revealed that the bacterial communities associated with the spores depended more on AMF than host plant identity. The composition of the bacterial populations linked to the spores could be predominantly influenced by a specific spore wall composition or AMF exudate rather than by specific root exudates. The majority of the bacterial sequences that were common to both G. geosporum and G. constrictum spores were affiliated with taxonomic groups known to degrade biopolymers (Cellvibrio, Chondromyces, Flexibacter, Lysobacter, and Pseudomonas). Scanning electron microscopy of G. geosporum spores revealed that these bacteria are possibly feeding on the outer hyaline spore layer. The process of maturation and eventual germination of AMF spores might then benefit from the activity of the surface microorganisms degrading the outer hyaline wall layer.
    Publication en relation: Applied and Environmental Microbiology. - 2005/71/6673-6679
    Document hôte: Applied and Environmental Microbiology
    Identifiant: 10.1128/AEM.71.11.6673-6679.2005 (DOI)

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    Comparison of Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy and Isothermal Micro-calorimetry for Non-invasive Detection of Microbial Growth in Media Fills

    Brueckner, David, Roesti, David, Zuber, Ulrich, Schmidt, Rainer, Kraehenbuehl, Stefan, Bonkat, Gernot, Braissant, Olivier
    Scientific Reports (Nature Publisher Group), Jun 2016, Vol.6, p.27894 [Revue évaluée par les pairs]

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    Statistical analysis of denaturing gel electrophoresis (DGE) fingerprinting patterns

    Fromin, Nathalie
    Hamelin, Jérôme, Tarnawski, Sonia, Roesti, David, Jourdain-Miserez, K, Teyssier-Cuvelle, Sylvie, Gillet, F, Aragno, Michel, Rossi, Pierre
    Environmental Microbiology. - 2002/4/11/634-643
    2002
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    Titre: Statistical analysis of denaturing gel electrophoresis (DGE) fingerprinting patterns
    Auteur: Fromin, Nathalie
    Contributeur: Hamelin, Jérôme; Tarnawski, Sonia; Roesti, David; Jourdain-Miserez, K; Teyssier-Cuvelle, Sylvie; Gillet, F; Aragno, Michel; Rossi, Pierre
    Date: 2002
    Description: Technical developments in molecular biology have found extensive applications in the field of microbial ecology. Among these techniques, fingerprinting methods such as denaturing gel electrophoresis (DGE, including the three options: DGGE, TGGE and TTGE) has been applied to environmental samples over this last decade. Microbial ecologists took advantage of this technique, originally developed for the detection of single mutations, for the analysis of whole bacterial communities. However, until recently, the results of these high quality fingerprinting patterns were restricted to a visual interpretation, neglecting the analytical potential of the method in terms of statistical significance and ecological interpretation. A brief recall is presented here about the principles and limitations of DGE fingerprinting analysis, with an emphasis on the need of standardization of the whole analytical process. The main content focuses on statistical strategies for analysing the gel patterns, from single band examination to the analysis of whole fingerprinting profiles. Applying statistical method make the DGE fingerprinting technique a promising tool. Numerous samples can be analysed simultaneously, permitting the monitoring of microbial communities or simply bacterial groups for which occurrence and relative frequency are affected by any environmental parameter. As previously applied in the fields of plant and animal ecology, the use of statistics provides a significant advantage for the non-ambiguous interpretation of the spatial and temporal functioning of microbial communities.
    Publication en relation: Environmental Microbiology. - 2002/4/11/634-643
    Document hôte: Environmental Microbiology
    Identifiant: 10.1046/j.1462-2920.2002.00358.x (DOI)

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    Bacteria associated with spores of the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi Glomus geosporum and Glomus constrictum

    Roesti, David, Ineichen, Kurt, Braissant, Olivier, Redecker, Dirk, Wiemken, Andres, Aragno, Michel
    Applied and environmental microbiology, November 2005, Vol.71(11), pp.6673-9 [Revue évaluée par les pairs]
    MEDLINE/PubMed (U.S. National Library of Medicine)
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    Titre: Bacteria associated with spores of the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi Glomus geosporum and Glomus constrictum
    Auteur: Roesti, David; Ineichen, Kurt; Braissant, Olivier; Redecker, Dirk; Wiemken, Andres; Aragno, Michel
    Sujet: Mycorrhizae ; Asteraceae -- Microbiology ; Bacteria -- Classification ; Fungi -- Physiology ; Plantago -- Microbiology
    Description: Spores of the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) Glomus geosporum and Glomus constrictum were harvested from single-spore-derived pot cultures with either Plantago lanceolata or Hieracium pilosella as host plants. PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis revealed that the bacterial communities associated with the spores depended more on AMF than host plant identity. The composition of the bacterial populations linked to the spores could be predominantly influenced by a specific spore wall composition or AMF exudate rather than by specific root exudates. The majority of the bacterial sequences that were common to both G. geosporum and G. constrictum spores were affiliated with taxonomic groups known to degrade biopolymers (Cellvibrio, Chondromyces, Flexibacter, Lysobacter, and Pseudomonas). Scanning electron microscopy of G. geosporum spores revealed that these bacteria are possibly feeding on the outer hyaline spore layer. The process of maturation and eventual germination of...
    Fait partie de: Applied and environmental microbiology, November 2005, Vol.71(11), pp.6673-9
    Identifiant: 0099-2240 (ISSN); 16269696 Version (PMID)

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    Diversity of phlD alleles in the rhizosphere of wheat cropped under annual rice–wheat rotation in fields of the Indo-Gangetic plains: influence of cultivation conditions

    Imfeld, Gwenael, Shani, Noam, Roesti, David, Fromin, Nathalie, N. Johri, Bhavdish, Gaur, Rachna, Rossi, Pierre, Locatelli, Laurent, Poly, Franck, Aragno, Michel
    Current science (Bangalore), 2006, Vol.90(11), pp.1521-1525 [Revue évaluée par les pairs]
    Hyper Article en Ligne (CCSd), Hyper Article en Ligne Open Access (CCSd)
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    Titre: Diversity of phlD alleles in the rhizosphere of wheat cropped under annual rice–wheat rotation in fields of the Indo-Gangetic plains: influence of cultivation conditions
    Auteur: Imfeld, Gwenael; Shani, Noam; Roesti, David; Fromin, Nathalie; N. Johri, Bhavdish; Gaur, Rachna; Rossi, Pierre; Locatelli, Laurent; Poly, Franck; Aragno, Michel
    Sujet: Life Sciences ; Biodiversity ; Life Sciences ; Ecology, Environment ; Phld ; 4-Dapg ; Wheat Rhizosphere ; Rice–Wheat ; Phld ; Sciences (General)
    Description: The antibiotic 2,4-diacetyphloroglucinol is a major determinant in the biocontrol of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria associated with crops of agronomic relevance. The phlD gene is a useful marker of genetic and phenotypic diversity of 2,4-DAPG-producing rhizobacteria. A two-step amplification procedure was developed in order to assess directly the presence of phlD in environmental DNA, avoiding the tedious procedure of phlD-positive strain screening and isolation. We found a predominance of one or two phlD alleles in wheat fields cultivated in rice–wheat rotations for twenty years, suggesting that continuous rice–wheat cropping would lead to an enrichment of particular phlD genotypes. We also recovered new sequences with no close relative among known phlD sequences, indicating that part of the phlD allelic diversity might have been missed using standard media culture conditions.
    Fait partie de: Current science (Bangalore), 2006, Vol.90(11), pp.1521-1525
    Identifiant: 0011-3891 (ISSN)